Speed and accuracy of rapid speech output by adolescents with residual speech sound errors including rhotics

Jonathan L. Preston, Mary Louise Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Children with residual speech sound errors are often underserved clinically, yet there has been a lack of recent research elucidating the specific deficits in this population. Adolescents aged 10-14 with residual speech sound errors (RE) that included rhotics were compared to normally speaking peers on tasks assessing speed and accuracy of speech production. The two groups were evaluated on an oral diadochokinetic task, which required rapid production of the trisyllable/ pΛtΛkΛ/, and two rapid naming tasks: monosyllabic letter names and multisyllabic picture names. No significant group differences were observed in the speed of trisyllables on the DDK task, whether examining all attempts or only correct productions. However, the RE group was less accurate and more variable in their production of the trisyllables. In addition, the RE group was slower and phonologically less accurate in rapidly naming multisyllabic pictures, but not in naming letters. A combination of speed and accuracy measures from these tasks revealed relatively little overlap between groups. Results suggest that both speed and accuracy may be impaired in adolescents with RE, although the underlying causal mechanisms require further exploration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-318
Number of pages18
JournalClinical Linguistics and Phonetics
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Accuracy
  • Adolescent
  • Diadochokinesis
  • Rapid naming
  • Residual speech errors
  • Speed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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