Sociotropic cognition moderates stress-induced cardiovascular responsiveness in women through effects on total peripheral resistance, but not cardiac output

Marie D. Sauro, Randall S. Jorgensen, Craig K. Ewart, Jennifer L. Schum, Paul Gelling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of mortality in women, few studies have examined the role of psychosocial factors in its development. This study examined the moderating effects of sociotropic cognition (SC), a need for social acceptance and approval, on psychosocial stress-induced cardiovascular responsiveness (CVR) and affect reactivity in women. Sixty-eight normotensive, college-aged females were randomly assigned to a low or high social threat condition. Measures of systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressures (SBP, DBP and MAP, respectively), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), total peripheral resistance (TPR) and negative affect were collected during rest, and under conditions of high vs. low interpersonal threat. A two-step hierarchical regression analysis was performed to predict all response variables (BPs, HR, CO, TPR and affect). Increases in SBP, DBP, MAP, TPR and negative affect were greater in the high threat than low threat condition. Changes in SBP, MAP and TPR positively covaried with SC under conditions of high interpersonal threat, but showed no significant covariation in the low threat condition. The data suggest that an excessive need for social acceptance may contribute to rises in BP through an increase in TPR, but not CO under conditions of high social threat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-64
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Psychophysiology
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Sociotropic cognition
  • Women's health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology (medical)

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