Social Media and U.S. Journalists: Uses and perceived effects on perceived norms and values

Lars Willnat, David H. Weaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study, based on a representative online survey of 1080 US journalists conducted in 2013, analyses the demographic and organizational predictors of how journalists use social media and how they evaluate the impact of these media on their professional norms and values. The findings indicate that 9 of 10 US journalists regularly use social media in their work—but mainly to check on what other news organizations are doing and to look for breaking news events. The most frequent users of social media are younger journalists with higher incomes who work for television, radio, or online news organizations. The findings also indicate that journalists who hold more positive attitudes toward the use of social media in journalism, and those who think that social media are more important in their jobs, tend to be more supportive of the populist-mobilizer and the disseminator roles of journalism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)889-909
Number of pages21
JournalDigital Journalism
Volume6
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 9 2018

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social media
journalist
Television
Values
journalism
news
online survey
television
radio
income
event

Keywords

  • journalism
  • professional roles
  • social media
  • survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Cite this

Social Media and U.S. Journalists : Uses and perceived effects on perceived norms and values. / Willnat, Lars; Weaver, David H.

In: Digital Journalism, Vol. 6, No. 7, 09.08.2018, p. 889-909.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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