Social identity threats: How media and discrimination affect Muslim Americans' identification as Americans and trust in the U.S. Government

Muniba Saleem, Magdalena E. Wojcieszak, Ian Hawkins, Miao Li, Srividya Ramasubramanian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Politicians within the United States and across many Western societies are concerned about the extent to which Muslims are successfully integrating within their countries. The present research examined how interpersonal (discrimination) and mediated (negative news coverage of Muslims) social identity threats dynamically change young Muslim Americans' strength of identification as American and Muslim, as well as their trust in the U.S. government. Data from a three-wave longitudinal survey show that Time 1, negative news coverage of Muslims (but not discrimination), significantly reduced Time 2, strength of identification as an American, which subsequently reduced Time 3, trust in the U.S. government. Muslim identification did not change as a function of interpersonal or mediated social identity threats. These findings suggest that negative media portrayals can have adverse effects on the national identification of some minority groups, and-crucially-that these effects may be stronger than those of personally experienced discrimination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)214-236
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Communication
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Media Effects
  • Muslims
  • National Identification
  • Political Trust
  • Social Identity Threats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Social identity threats: How media and discrimination affect Muslim Americans' identification as Americans and trust in the U.S. Government'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this