Social computing environments, Digital Natives and instructional technology: Promises of equality and practices of exclusion

Alan Foley, Rick Voithofer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This paper examines the discursive confluence of social computing environments, Digital Natives and the practices of instructional technology delineating how these discourses can potentially create exclusion in the implementation and instructional use of these technologies. Educators are adopting social networking ideas and technologies in order to create educational opportunities for students. These trends are based on the assumption that creating knowledge using these technologies is more democratic compared to experiences in traditional classrooms where unequal power relations may be more oppressive and where content comes from monolithic and static sources like textbooks. Subject positions are created for students on social networking sites that offer the appearance of equal participation but actually contain their own social hierarchies and oppressions.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society
Pages85-102
Number of pages18
Volume5
Edition2
StatePublished - 2009

Publication series

NameThe International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society
Volume5

Fingerprint

instructional technology
equality
exclusion
networking
educational opportunity
oppression
textbook
student
educator
classroom
participation
discourse
trend
Social Environment
experience

Keywords

  • Web 2.0
  • digital native
  • disability
  • learning
  • social computing
  • social network
  • students
  • technology

Cite this

Foley, A., & Voithofer, R. (2009). Social computing environments, Digital Natives and instructional technology: Promises of equality and practices of exclusion. In The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society (2 ed., Vol. 5, pp. 85-102). (The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society; Vol. 5).

Social computing environments, Digital Natives and instructional technology: Promises of equality and practices of exclusion. / Foley, Alan; Voithofer, Rick.

The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society. Vol. 5 2. ed. 2009. p. 85-102 (The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society; Vol. 5).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Foley, A & Voithofer, R 2009, Social computing environments, Digital Natives and instructional technology: Promises of equality and practices of exclusion. in The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society. 2 edn, vol. 5, The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society, vol. 5, pp. 85-102.
Foley A, Voithofer R. Social computing environments, Digital Natives and instructional technology: Promises of equality and practices of exclusion. In The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society. 2 ed. Vol. 5. 2009. p. 85-102. (The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society).
Foley, Alan ; Voithofer, Rick. / Social computing environments, Digital Natives and instructional technology: Promises of equality and practices of exclusion. The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society. Vol. 5 2. ed. 2009. pp. 85-102 (The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society).
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