Simulating Interrogation in the Lab: Examining the Effectiveness of Physical Pain, Coercive Verbal Pressure, and Rapport-Building for Obtaining Reliable Information

Shannon Houck, Joeann M. Salvati, Aldert Vrij, Leonard S. Newman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Three lab experiments used an interrogation simulation to examine the relative effectiveness of pain, coercive verbal pressure, and rapport-building for obtaining reliable information. Investigators questioned participants about information they were instructed to keep secret. We measured how many people gave reliable and unreliable information under pain (Study 1; N = 49), verbal pressure alone and in combination with pain (Study 2; N = 87), and verbal pressure and pain compared to a rapport-based interrogation (Study 3; N = 158). Results empirically support much of what field experts and scholars have previously claimed: pain and psychological coercion result in unreliable information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Applied Security Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • coercion
  • intelligence
  • Interrogation simulation
  • physical pain
  • rapport

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Safety Research
  • Law

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