Short peptides self-assemble to produce catalytic amyloids

Caroline M. Rufo, Yurii S. Moroz, Olesia V. Moroz, Jan Stöhr, Tyler A. Smith, Xiaozhen Hu, William F. Degrado, Ivan Korendovych

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

212 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Enzymes fold into unique three-dimensional structures, which underlie their remarkable catalytic properties. The requirement to adopt a stable, folded conformation is likely to contribute to their relatively large size (>10,000 Da). However, much shorter peptides can achieve well-defined conformations through the formation of amyloid fibrils. To test whether short amyloid-forming peptides might in fact be capable of enzyme-like catalysis, we designed a series of seven-residue peptides that act as Zn2+ -dependent esterases. Zn2+ helps stabilize the fibril formation, while also acting as a cofactor to catalyse acyl ester hydrolysis. These results indicate that prion-like fibrils are able to not only catalyse their own formation, but they can also catalyse chemical reactions. Thus, they might have served as intermediates in the evolution of modern-day enzymes. These results also have implications for the design of self-assembling nanostructured catalysts including ones containing a variety of biological and non-biological metal ions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-309
Number of pages7
JournalNature Chemistry
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Amyloid
Peptides
Enzymes
Conformations
Prions
Esterases
Catalysis
Metal ions
Chemical reactions
Hydrolysis
Esters
Catalysts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Rufo, C. M., Moroz, Y. S., Moroz, O. V., Stöhr, J., Smith, T. A., Hu, X., ... Korendovych, I. (2014). Short peptides self-assemble to produce catalytic amyloids. Nature Chemistry, 6(4), 303-309. https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.1894

Short peptides self-assemble to produce catalytic amyloids. / Rufo, Caroline M.; Moroz, Yurii S.; Moroz, Olesia V.; Stöhr, Jan; Smith, Tyler A.; Hu, Xiaozhen; Degrado, William F.; Korendovych, Ivan.

In: Nature Chemistry, Vol. 6, No. 4, 2014, p. 303-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rufo, CM, Moroz, YS, Moroz, OV, Stöhr, J, Smith, TA, Hu, X, Degrado, WF & Korendovych, I 2014, 'Short peptides self-assemble to produce catalytic amyloids', Nature Chemistry, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 303-309. https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.1894
Rufo CM, Moroz YS, Moroz OV, Stöhr J, Smith TA, Hu X et al. Short peptides self-assemble to produce catalytic amyloids. Nature Chemistry. 2014;6(4):303-309. https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.1894
Rufo, Caroline M. ; Moroz, Yurii S. ; Moroz, Olesia V. ; Stöhr, Jan ; Smith, Tyler A. ; Hu, Xiaozhen ; Degrado, William F. ; Korendovych, Ivan. / Short peptides self-assemble to produce catalytic amyloids. In: Nature Chemistry. 2014 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 303-309.
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