Separate Room Testing Accommodations for Students With and Without ADHD

Benjamin J. Lovett, Lawrence J Lewandowski, Lindsey Carter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are frequently provided a separate room in which to take exams, to reduce external distractions. However, little research has explored the efficacy of this accommodation. In the present study, college students with (n = 27) and without (n = 42) ADHD diagnoses were administered two parallel forms of a timed silent reading comprehension test, one in a classroom with other students, and one in a private, proctored setting. A two-way analysis of variance found no significant main effects for either ADHD status or test setting on performance, and no significant interaction between the factors either. However, inspection of student-level data and exploration of continuous relationships between self-reported ADHD symptoms and test performance patterns suggested that separate room accommodations may be beneficial for a subgroup of students with ADHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Psychoeducational Assessment
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

ADHD
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
accommodation
Students
student
analysis of variance
performance
Reading
Analysis of Variance
comprehension
classroom
interaction
Research

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • assessment
  • testing accommodations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Separate Room Testing Accommodations for Students With and Without ADHD. / Lovett, Benjamin J.; Lewandowski, Lawrence J; Carter, Lindsey.

In: Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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