Sense of coherence, negative life events and appraisal of physical health among university students

Randall S. Jorgensen, James J. Frankowski, Michael P. Carey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined the stress-buffering effects of the 'sense of coherence' among 116 undergraduates (70 females and 46 males) with a mean age of 18.6 years. Self-reported physical well-being and psychological distress were assessed on two occasions separated by two months. Assessment of the sense of coherence occurred at time-one, whereas assessment of negative life-events for the past year occurred at time-two. Sense of coherence correlated negatively with negative life events and reported psychological symptoms of both occasions, and negative life events correlated positively with both assessments of psychological distress. Negative life events correlated positively with physical ailments reported for both occasions only among students low in sense of coherence; this significant correlation persisted after accounting for the relationship between psychological and physical symptoms. We discuss the possible salubrious effects of a sense of coherence on the health appraisals of young adults experiencing stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1079-1089
Number of pages11
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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