Self-Reported ADHD and Adult Health in the United States

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Abstract

Objective: Informed by a social determinants of health framework, we investigate the relationship between self-reported ADHD diagnosis status and adult health, and whether observed associations are attenuated by biomedical and socioeconomic factors. Method: Using 2007 National Health Interview Survey data (N = 19,104), we present multivariate logistic regression analyses of associations between self-reported ADHD diagnosis status and five adult health outcomes. Results: ADHD diagnosis was significantly associated with higher odds of injury, physical health conditions, functional limitations, fair/poor health, and psychological distress in fully specified models (adjusted odds ratios [AORs] = 1.62-2.36). Inclusion of controls for exogenous demographic characteristics, psychiatric comorbidities and health behaviors, and adult social and economic statuses attenuated but did not eliminate observed associations between ADHD and poorer adult health. Conclusion: Research on adult health outcomes for those with ADHD should include consideration of the mechanisms by which a diagnosis of ADHD leads to cumulative social disadvantages that independently contribute to poorer health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Attention Disorders
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 1 2018

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Health
Health Fairs
Social Determinants of Health
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Health Status
Psychiatry
Comorbidity
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Economics
Demography
Interviews
Psychology
Wounds and Injuries
Research

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • adult health
  • life course
  • social determinants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: Informed by a social determinants of health framework, we investigate the relationship between self-reported ADHD diagnosis status and adult health, and whether observed associations are attenuated by biomedical and socioeconomic factors. Method: Using 2007 National Health Interview Survey data (N = 19,104), we present multivariate logistic regression analyses of associations between self-reported ADHD diagnosis status and five adult health outcomes. Results: ADHD diagnosis was significantly associated with higher odds of injury, physical health conditions, functional limitations, fair/poor health, and psychological distress in fully specified models (adjusted odds ratios [AORs] = 1.62-2.36). Inclusion of controls for exogenous demographic characteristics, psychiatric comorbidities and health behaviors, and adult social and economic statuses attenuated but did not eliminate observed associations between ADHD and poorer adult health. Conclusion: Research on adult health outcomes for those with ADHD should include consideration of the mechanisms by which a diagnosis of ADHD leads to cumulative social disadvantages that independently contribute to poorer health outcomes.",
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