Self-Control Depletion, Frustration Tolerance, Irritability, and Engagement in Risky Behaviors in College Students With and Without Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Risk

Catherine L. Montgomery, Kevin M. Antshel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

College students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often have poor self-control, low frustration tolerance (FT), and associated irritability. These features are associated with engagement in risky behaviors (ERBs). The Self-Control Strength Model (SCSM) was used to examine relationships between ADHD symptoms, FT, irritability, and self-control resource depletion and associations with ERBs in 247 college students randomized into depletion/non-depletion groups. Participants completed state and trait measures and two experimental tasks: the Stroop Color-Word Task to deplete resources, and the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (Computerized) to induce frustration and measure frustration tolerance. Linear and logistic regressions were used to analyze associations, and demonstrated that ADHD symptoms and FT were positively associated with several ERBs. However, due to failure of the Stroop to adequately deplete self-control resources, the SCSM cannot be fully analyzed. Ultimately, these results provide additional support for positive associations between ADHD symptoms, state irritability, and ERB in college students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-17
Number of pages15
JournalEmerging Adulthood
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2024

Keywords

  • attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • college
  • emotion regulation
  • quantitative methods
  • risk-taking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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