Role of Filter Characterization on the Mechanism of Depth Filters

Session No. 307 - Filtration: Recent Advances in Product Development and Monitoring

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Abstract

Although the most effective means for evaluating the filtration behavior of a geotextile is to conduct a performance test, such as a long-term filtration (LTF) test or a gradient ratio (GR) test, these tests are rarely performed. As a result, designers often look toward conservative empirical clogging criteria that may or may not be appropriate for the selection of a geotextile as a filter. Empirical clogging criteria are generally based on the 09, and porosity of the geotextile. This study focuses on the importance of these geotextile parameters on the retention and particulate clogging potential of geotextile filters. In this study, several LTF tests were conducted on nonwoven geotextiles and polymeric meshes with similar opening sizes. By performing the tests on polymeric meshes of known opening size (and low percent open area), the effect of geotextile porosity on LTF test results can be evaluated. The extent of clogging within the geotextile and at the soil/geotextile mesh interfaces was studied using photomicrographs of epoxied sections of the soil/geotextile-mesh systems. Based on the results of this study, it does not appear that geotextile porosity and 09, are important in the retention and particulate clogging behavior of geotextiles. Although the most effective means for evaluating the filtration behavior of a geotextile is to conduct a performance test, such as a long-term filtration (LTF) test or a gradient ratio (GR) test, these tests are rarely performed. As a result, designers often look toward conservative empirical clogging criteria that may or may not be appropriate for the selection of a geotextile as a filter. Empirical clogging criteria are generally based on the 09, and porosity of the geotextile. This study focuses on the importance of these geotextile parameters on the retention and particulate clogging potential of geotextile filters. In this study, several LTF tests were conducted on nonwoven geotextiles and polymeric meshes with similar opening sizes. By performing the tests on polymeric meshes of known opening size (and low percent open area), the effect of geotextile porosity on LTF test results can be evaluated. The extent of clogging within the geotextile and at the soil/geotextile mesh interfaces was studied using photomicrographs of epoxied sections of the soil/geotextile-mesh systems. Based on the results of this study, it does not appear that geotextile porosity and 09, are important in the retention and particulate clogging behavior of geotextiles.
Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - 1999

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product development
geotextile
filter
monitoring
porosity
test
soil

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@conference{c50b5da8cfeb4f51a6d69d453b50a2b6,
title = "Role of Filter Characterization on the Mechanism of Depth Filters: Session No. 307 - Filtration: Recent Advances in Product Development and Monitoring",
abstract = "Although the most effective means for evaluating the filtration behavior of a geotextile is to conduct a performance test, such as a long-term filtration (LTF) test or a gradient ratio (GR) test, these tests are rarely performed. As a result, designers often look toward conservative empirical clogging criteria that may or may not be appropriate for the selection of a geotextile as a filter. Empirical clogging criteria are generally based on the 09, and porosity of the geotextile. This study focuses on the importance of these geotextile parameters on the retention and particulate clogging potential of geotextile filters. In this study, several LTF tests were conducted on nonwoven geotextiles and polymeric meshes with similar opening sizes. By performing the tests on polymeric meshes of known opening size (and low percent open area), the effect of geotextile porosity on LTF test results can be evaluated. The extent of clogging within the geotextile and at the soil/geotextile mesh interfaces was studied using photomicrographs of epoxied sections of the soil/geotextile-mesh systems. Based on the results of this study, it does not appear that geotextile porosity and 09, are important in the retention and particulate clogging behavior of geotextiles. Although the most effective means for evaluating the filtration behavior of a geotextile is to conduct a performance test, such as a long-term filtration (LTF) test or a gradient ratio (GR) test, these tests are rarely performed. As a result, designers often look toward conservative empirical clogging criteria that may or may not be appropriate for the selection of a geotextile as a filter. Empirical clogging criteria are generally based on the 09, and porosity of the geotextile. This study focuses on the importance of these geotextile parameters on the retention and particulate clogging potential of geotextile filters. In this study, several LTF tests were conducted on nonwoven geotextiles and polymeric meshes with similar opening sizes. By performing the tests on polymeric meshes of known opening size (and low percent open area), the effect of geotextile porosity on LTF test results can be evaluated. The extent of clogging within the geotextile and at the soil/geotextile mesh interfaces was studied using photomicrographs of epoxied sections of the soil/geotextile-mesh systems. Based on the results of this study, it does not appear that geotextile porosity and 09, are important in the retention and particulate clogging behavior of geotextiles.",
author = "Bhatia, {Shobha K}",
year = "1999",
language = "English (US)",

}

TY - CONF

T1 - Role of Filter Characterization on the Mechanism of Depth Filters

T2 - Session No. 307 - Filtration: Recent Advances in Product Development and Monitoring

AU - Bhatia, Shobha K

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - Although the most effective means for evaluating the filtration behavior of a geotextile is to conduct a performance test, such as a long-term filtration (LTF) test or a gradient ratio (GR) test, these tests are rarely performed. As a result, designers often look toward conservative empirical clogging criteria that may or may not be appropriate for the selection of a geotextile as a filter. Empirical clogging criteria are generally based on the 09, and porosity of the geotextile. This study focuses on the importance of these geotextile parameters on the retention and particulate clogging potential of geotextile filters. In this study, several LTF tests were conducted on nonwoven geotextiles and polymeric meshes with similar opening sizes. By performing the tests on polymeric meshes of known opening size (and low percent open area), the effect of geotextile porosity on LTF test results can be evaluated. The extent of clogging within the geotextile and at the soil/geotextile mesh interfaces was studied using photomicrographs of epoxied sections of the soil/geotextile-mesh systems. Based on the results of this study, it does not appear that geotextile porosity and 09, are important in the retention and particulate clogging behavior of geotextiles. Although the most effective means for evaluating the filtration behavior of a geotextile is to conduct a performance test, such as a long-term filtration (LTF) test or a gradient ratio (GR) test, these tests are rarely performed. As a result, designers often look toward conservative empirical clogging criteria that may or may not be appropriate for the selection of a geotextile as a filter. Empirical clogging criteria are generally based on the 09, and porosity of the geotextile. This study focuses on the importance of these geotextile parameters on the retention and particulate clogging potential of geotextile filters. In this study, several LTF tests were conducted on nonwoven geotextiles and polymeric meshes with similar opening sizes. By performing the tests on polymeric meshes of known opening size (and low percent open area), the effect of geotextile porosity on LTF test results can be evaluated. The extent of clogging within the geotextile and at the soil/geotextile mesh interfaces was studied using photomicrographs of epoxied sections of the soil/geotextile-mesh systems. Based on the results of this study, it does not appear that geotextile porosity and 09, are important in the retention and particulate clogging behavior of geotextiles.

AB - Although the most effective means for evaluating the filtration behavior of a geotextile is to conduct a performance test, such as a long-term filtration (LTF) test or a gradient ratio (GR) test, these tests are rarely performed. As a result, designers often look toward conservative empirical clogging criteria that may or may not be appropriate for the selection of a geotextile as a filter. Empirical clogging criteria are generally based on the 09, and porosity of the geotextile. This study focuses on the importance of these geotextile parameters on the retention and particulate clogging potential of geotextile filters. In this study, several LTF tests were conducted on nonwoven geotextiles and polymeric meshes with similar opening sizes. By performing the tests on polymeric meshes of known opening size (and low percent open area), the effect of geotextile porosity on LTF test results can be evaluated. The extent of clogging within the geotextile and at the soil/geotextile mesh interfaces was studied using photomicrographs of epoxied sections of the soil/geotextile-mesh systems. Based on the results of this study, it does not appear that geotextile porosity and 09, are important in the retention and particulate clogging behavior of geotextiles. Although the most effective means for evaluating the filtration behavior of a geotextile is to conduct a performance test, such as a long-term filtration (LTF) test or a gradient ratio (GR) test, these tests are rarely performed. As a result, designers often look toward conservative empirical clogging criteria that may or may not be appropriate for the selection of a geotextile as a filter. Empirical clogging criteria are generally based on the 09, and porosity of the geotextile. This study focuses on the importance of these geotextile parameters on the retention and particulate clogging potential of geotextile filters. In this study, several LTF tests were conducted on nonwoven geotextiles and polymeric meshes with similar opening sizes. By performing the tests on polymeric meshes of known opening size (and low percent open area), the effect of geotextile porosity on LTF test results can be evaluated. The extent of clogging within the geotextile and at the soil/geotextile mesh interfaces was studied using photomicrographs of epoxied sections of the soil/geotextile-mesh systems. Based on the results of this study, it does not appear that geotextile porosity and 09, are important in the retention and particulate clogging behavior of geotextiles.

M3 - Paper

ER -