Risk factors for nursing home admissions and exits: A discrete-time hazard function approach

V. L. Greene, J. I. Ondrich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

208 Scopus citations

Abstract

Discrete-time hazard functions were estimated to determine factors associated with the probability of admission to a nursing home from the community, and the probability of discharge to the community from nursing home care, for 3,332 individuals enrolled in The National Long Term Care Channeling Demonstration. This was a relatively frail elderly population assessed to be at high risk for nursing home use. In predicting admissions, major factors were found to be ethnicity (Blacks and Hispanics were at much lower risk), homeownership, advancing age, living alone, exhibiting higher cognitive and functional impairment levels, physician use, and living in an area with a larger nursing home bed supply. The probability of being discharged alive was predicted by several factors, including ethnicity (Blacks being less likely to be discharged), homeownership, being of younger age, better (self-rated) health, functional and cognitive capacities, and medical acuity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S250-S258
JournalJournals of Gerontology
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging

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