Risk and Protective Factors for Late Talking

An Epidemiologic Investigation

Beverly Anne Collisson, Susan A. Graham, Jonathan Preston, M. Sarah Rose, Sheila McDonald, Suzanne Tough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To identify risk and protective factors for late talking in toddlers between 24 and 30 months of age in a large community-based cohort. Study design: A prospective, longitudinal pregnancy cohort of 1023 mother-infant pairs in metropolitan Calgary, Canada, were followed across 5 time points: before 25 weeks gestation, between 34-36 weeks gestation, and at 4, 12, and 24 months postpartum. Toddlers who scored ≤10th percentile on The MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories: Words and Sentences between 24 and 30 months of age were identified as late talkers. Thirty-four candidate characteristics theoretically and/or empirically linked to language development and/or language impairment were collected using survey methodology. Results: The prevalence of late talking was 12.6%. Risk factors for late talking in the multivariable model included: male sex (P = .017) and a family history of late talking and/or diagnosed speech or language delay (P = .002). Toddlers were significantly less likely to be late talkers if they engaged in informal play opportunities (P = .013), were read to or shown picture books daily (P <.001), or cared for primarily in child care centers (P = .001). Conclusions: Both biological and environmental factors were associated with the development of late talking. Biological factors placed toddlers at risk for late talking, and facets of the environment played a protective role. Enveloping infants and toddlers in language-rich milieus that promote opportunities for playing, reading, and sharing books daily may decrease risk for delayed early vocabulary.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 30 2015

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Language Development Disorders
Biological Factors
Pregnancy
Language
Language Development
Vocabulary
Child Care
Postpartum Period
Canada
Reading
Mothers
Equipment and Supplies
Protective Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Risk and Protective Factors for Late Talking : An Epidemiologic Investigation. / Collisson, Beverly Anne; Graham, Susan A.; Preston, Jonathan; Rose, M. Sarah; McDonald, Sheila; Tough, Suzanne.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, 30.07.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Collisson, Beverly Anne ; Graham, Susan A. ; Preston, Jonathan ; Rose, M. Sarah ; McDonald, Sheila ; Tough, Suzanne. / Risk and Protective Factors for Late Talking : An Epidemiologic Investigation. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2015.
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