Retrograde amnesia produced by electrical stimulation of the amygdala: Attenuation with adrenergic antagonists

Debra B. Sternberg, Paul E. Gold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Subseizure electrical stimulation of the amygdala produced retrograde amnesia for a visual discrimination shock-motivated task. Animals pretreated with the α-adrenergic antagonist phenoxybenzamine, or the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol, did not develop amnesia. The findings indicate that adrenergic antagonists attenuate amnesia produced by amygdala stimulation for visual discrimination training. These results are consistent with previous evidence indicating that adrenergic antagonists attenuate the amnesias produced by a variety of agents, and thus, suggest that adrenergic mechanisms may be involved in the production of retrograde amnesia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-65
Number of pages7
JournalBrain Research
Volume211
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 27 1981
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • adrenergic antagonists
  • amygdala
  • avoidance training
  • catecholamines
  • memory
  • memory storage
  • retrograde amnesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

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