Research Note—Integrated Care Training and Preparedness: Evidence From 5-Years of Postgraduation Data

Li sade Saxe Zerden, Brianna M. Lombardi, Ting Guan, Steve Day, Anne Jones, Meryl Kanfer

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

Abstract

Social work has seen significant federal investment through the Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training (BHWET) for Professionals grants. This research note examined differences between BHWET trainees and general MSW graduates regarding self-reported knowledge of integrated behavioral health competencies, job placement, and starting salaries. A survey was administered 10 months after graduation (N=288) for five graduating classes (2014-2018). Bivariate two-tailed t-tests and Fisher’s exact tests examined group differences. BHWET participants rated interprofessional abilities and integrated care skills significantly higher; were significantly more likely to secure employment quicker; work on interprofessional teams; and earn higher salaries, compared to counterparts. Demonstrating the effectiveness of workforce initiatives is necessary to document best practices and continue federal investment in the social work workforce.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Social Work Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Research Note—Integrated Care Training and Preparedness: Evidence From 5-Years of Postgraduation Data'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this