Reliance on Direct and Mediated Contact and Public Policies Supporting Outgroup Harm

Muniba Saleem, Grace S. Yang, Srividya Ramasubramanian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two studies examined the effects of reliance on direct and media-based contact for information about Muslims on Americans' stereotypic beliefs of and negative emotions toward Muslims and support for public policies harming Muslims domestically and internationally. Results revealed that reliance on media for information about Muslims was positively associated with stereotypic beliefs, negative emotions, and support for harmful policies. Reliance on direct contact for information about Muslims produced the opposite results. Results from a three-wave longitudinal design revealed that reliance on media and direct contact significantly predict changes in negative emotions which then predict changes in support for civil restrictions for Muslim Americans. We discuss the differential effects of reliance on media-based and direct contact in influencing intergroup outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)604-624
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Communication
Volume66
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Contact
  • Intergroup
  • Media Effects
  • Prejudice
  • Public Policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

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