Relationship-Specific Satisfaction and Adjustment in Emerging Adulthood: The Moderating Role of Adult Attachment Orientation

William J. Chopik, Amy K. Nuttall, Jeewon Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Highly satisfying social relationships make us happy and healthy—they fill us with joy and a sense of meaning and purpose. But do all the relationships in our lives contribute equally to our well-being and do some people benefit more from certain relationships? The current study examined associations between the satisfaction of specific relationships within a family (i.e., with parents, siblings) and adjustment (i.e., life satisfaction and depressive symptoms) among 572 emerging adults aged 18–25 (Mage = 19.95, SD = 1.42; 77.4% female). Overall, relationship satisfaction with mothers and fathers was associated with better adjustment. Attachment anxiety and avoidance moderated associations between relationship-specific satisfaction and adjustment. We discuss the findings in the context of the shifting of attachment functions during emerging adulthood and the dynamic nature of close relationships across the lifespan.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-52
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Adult Development
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Attachment orientations
  • Emerging adulthood
  • Family systems
  • Relationship-specific satisfaction
  • Siblings

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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