Relating structure to process in historical population analysis: case studies from eighteenth century Spanish America.

D. J. Robinson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The relationships between patterns and processes have long been debated, as have the merits and defects of cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis. The author reviews the utility of these approaches in the context of two brief studies that involve the components basic to any historical population research, namely births, marriages, migration and death. In Caracas, widely spaced cross-sections of data at the city level can mask important processes operating at lower levels. In Cordoba, the distribution of kin and god-kin suggests socio-economic structuring that facilitates the interpretation of household and family change, and population migration between and within the settlement.-after Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPeriod and place: research methods in historical geography
EditorsA.R.H. Baker, M. Billinge
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages87-98
Number of pages12
StatePublished - 1982

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

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