Refugee Gardening: An Opportunity to Improve Economic Conditions, Food Security, and Mental Health

Research output: Other contribution

Abstract

Every year, thousands of refugees enter the United States. Conditions prior to resettlement, such as exposure to conflict, persecution, and loss, as well as conditions after resettlement, such as isolation and adjustment to a new culture, impact refugee mental health, economic security, and food security. Refugee access to land and resources for gardening has been shown to have quality of life benefits, including enhanced food security and mental health outcomes. This research brief summarizes the results of a recent study that examined how community gardening may reduce food insecurity and adverse mental health among refugees living in Central New York. Findings demonstrate that refugee gardening positively impacts mental health, food security, and feelings of connection with refugee communities.
Original languageEnglish (US)
TypeResearch Brief
Media of outputOnline
PublisherLerner Center for Public Health Promotion
Edition198
StatePublished - Nov 8 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Refugee Gardening: An Opportunity to Improve Economic Conditions, Food Security, and Mental Health'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this