Raising awareness of dominance

Does recognising dominance mean one has to dismiss the values of the dominant group?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social justice education, it is argued, is a form of and essential to moral education, especially for dominant group affiliated students. Under this condition, one of the essential goals of social justice education must be raising an awareness of dominance. The meaning of dominance is discussed and it is argued that overly simplistic conceptions of what dominance means may lead to the mistaken assumption that in order to recognise one's own dominance, one has to reject the values of the dominant group. The distinction between the "dominance of values" and the "values of the dominant group" is suggested but found inadequate. What is required is a critical analysis of the complexity, subtlety and systemic interrelatedness and embeddedness of dominant beliefs, values and standards in western, democratic societies. Without a serious approach to the complexities of dominance, future teachers will not be able to tend successfully to all their students, will not be able to contribute to social justice and will be able to hide all this behind good intentions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-70
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Moral Education
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2001
Externally publishedYes

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social justice
Values
Group
moral education
education
student
teacher
society
Social Justice
Education
Intentions
Embeddedness
Conception
Moral Education
Critical Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

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