Racial prejudice and racial residential segregation in an urban model

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, racial prejudice is introduced into an urban model and results about racial discrimination and residential segregation are derived. To be specific, a household maximization problem is used to determine the market rent-distance function that gives no household an incentive to move. Prejudice is introduced by assuming that the racial composition of a location affects a household's utility and by deriving, for both blacks and whites, rent-distance functions that reflect racial composition. These rent-distance functions imply that if whites prefer segregation and some blacks prefer integration, no stable locational equilibrium exists for both races without discrimination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-396
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Urban Economics
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1976
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

rent
prejudice
segregation
racism
incentive
discrimination
market
Rent
Residential segregation
Distance function
Prejudice
Household
household
Incentives
Discrimination
Segregation
Locational equilibrium
Racial discrimination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Racial prejudice and racial residential segregation in an urban model. / Yinger, John McHenry.

In: Journal of Urban Economics, Vol. 3, No. 4, 1976, p. 383-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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