Race, Silence, and Writing Program Administration: A Qualitative Study of U.S. College Writing Programs.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

While Writing Studies scholarship has interrogated race and college writing instruction, we argue that it still needs to substantially build upon this work in systematic ways that intersect race and writing program administration (Craig and Perryman-Clark; Green; Inoue; and Poe). This article discusses the find ings of a survey administered in the spring of 2016. The results of the survey contribute to Writing Studies' current understanding of how race functions within writing programs. While the contingent nature of the labor force in most writing programs is acknowledged, WPAs hold a great deal of power to affect change in writing program curricula due to their ability to dictate what happens in terms of pedagogical training, faculty development, assessment practices, and student support (Halpern). When it comes to the consideration of race and writing program administration, participants in this study argued that scholars of color often work in isolation recognizing that programs lack effective strategies to systematically implement race-based pedagogy or examine specific institutional resources to help combat racism on campuses.
Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWPA Journal
Volume40
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2017

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