PYY3-36 infused systemically or directly into the VTA attenuates fentanyl seeking in male rats

A. Caffrey, E. Lavecchia, R. Merkel, Y. Zhang, K. S. Chichura, M. R. Hayes, R. P. Doyle, H. D. Schmidt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

More effective treatments for fentanyl use disorder are urgently needed. An emerging literature indicates that glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists attenuate voluntary opioid taking and seeking in rodents. However, GLP-1R agonists produce adverse malaise-like effects that may limit patient compliance. Recently, we developed a dual agonist of GLP-1Rs and neuropeptide Y2 receptors (Y2Rs) that attenuates fentanyl taking and seeking at doses that do not produce malaise-like effects in opioid-experienced rats. Whether activating Y2Rs alone is sufficient to reduce opioid taking and seeking, however, is not known. Here, we investigated the efficacy of the Y2R ligand PYY3-36 to reduce fentanyl self-administration and the reinstatement of fentanyl-seeking behavior, a model of relapse in humans. Male rats were allowed to self-administer fentanyl (2.5 μg/kg, i.v.) for 21 days on a fixed-ratio 5 (FR5) schedule of reinforcement. Rats were then pretreated with vehicle or PYY3-36 (50 μg/kg s.c.; 0.1 and 1.0 μg/100 nL intra-VTA) prior to fentanyl self-administration test sessions. There were no effects of systemic or intra-VTA PYY3-36 on intravenous fentanyl self-administration. Opioid taking was then extinguished. Prior to subsequent reinstatement test sessions, rats were pretreated with vehicle or PYY3-36 (50 μg/kg s.c.; 0.1 and 1.0 μg/100 nL intra-VTA). Both systemic and intra-VTA administration of PYY3-36 attenuated fentanyl reinstatement in male rats at doses that did not affect food intake or produce adverse malaise-like effects. These findings indicate that Y2R agonism alone is sufficient to decrease fentanyl-seeking behavior during abstinence in opioid-experienced rats and further support strategies aimed at targeting Y2Rs for treating opioid use disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number109686
JournalNeuropharmacology
Volume239
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2023

Keywords

  • GLP-1
  • Opioid
  • PYY
  • Relapse
  • Self-administration
  • VTA
  • Y2R

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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