Public administration in dark times

Some questions for the future of the field

Tina Nabatchi, Holly T. Goerdel, Shelly Peffer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This essay identifies two problems that impede the ability of public administration to govern effectively in dark times. First, public administration has failed to adequately acknowledge itself as an arbiter of political conflict and as a discipline responsible for shaping societal affairs. Second, the field is entrenched in a bureaucratic pathology that limits its capacity to address complex policy problems. We argue that these issues show a clear need for the reinvigoration of democratic ethos as the foundation for public administration. Building on the ideas of some Minnowbrook III working groups, we pose questions to help begin discussions about both democratic ethos and the ability of public administration to govern in dark times.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Public Administration Research and Theory
Volume21
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

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public administration
political conflict
ability
working group
pathology
time
Public Administration
Ethos

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Marketing

Cite this

Public administration in dark times : Some questions for the future of the field. / Nabatchi, Tina; Goerdel, Holly T.; Peffer, Shelly.

In: Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Vol. 21, No. SUPPL. 1, 01.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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