Programming via printing

Printing of ready-to-trigger, biocompatible, shape-memory polymers

Katy Pieri, Paul Chando, Pranav Soman, James H Henderson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Statement of Purpose: The ability to 3D print shape-memory polymers (SMPs) already pre-programmed for a subsequent function, such as a specific shape change, could have broad impact across diverse biomedical fields. Currently, 3D printed SMPs must be programmed in a separate step following the printing process, which requires that there be a means of physically deforming the SMP to impart a strain pattern inverse to that desired during recovery (Fig. 1). Available methods for producing strains in an SMP following printing are limited to simple deformations such as uniaxial compressions or tensions; creating complex strains is generally not feasible. However, recent studies suggest that the extrusion process during 3D printing can trap strains within the material 1,2 . With the long-term goal of program programing 1D, 2D, or 3D functional, single-material parts during, rather than following, printing, the goal of the present study was to quantify the extent to which strains can be trapped into simple 1D and 2D geometries during printing. To achieve this goal, we systematically studied the effect of temperature, printing speed, the multiplier print parameter, and fiber orientation on strain trapping in a cyto-and biocompatible SMP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSociety for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019
Subtitle of host publicationThe Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting
PublisherSociety for Biomaterials
Number of pages1
ISBN (Electronic)9781510883901
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Event42nd Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Seattle, United States
Duration: Apr 3 2019Apr 6 2019

Publication series

NameTransactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium
Volume40
ISSN (Print)1526-7547

Conference

Conference42nd Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period4/3/194/6/19

Fingerprint

Printing
Shape memory effect
Polymers
Aptitude
Fiber reinforced materials
Extrusion
Temperature
Recovery
Geometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Biotechnology
  • Biomaterials
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Pieri, K., Chando, P., Soman, P., & Henderson, J. H. (2019). Programming via printing: Printing of ready-to-trigger, biocompatible, shape-memory polymers. In Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting (Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium; Vol. 40). Society for Biomaterials.

Programming via printing : Printing of ready-to-trigger, biocompatible, shape-memory polymers. / Pieri, Katy; Chando, Paul; Soman, Pranav; Henderson, James H.

Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting. Society for Biomaterials, 2019. (Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium; Vol. 40).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Pieri, K, Chando, P, Soman, P & Henderson, JH 2019, Programming via printing: Printing of ready-to-trigger, biocompatible, shape-memory polymers. in Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting. Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium, vol. 40, Society for Biomaterials, 42nd Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence, Seattle, United States, 4/3/19.
Pieri K, Chando P, Soman P, Henderson JH. Programming via printing: Printing of ready-to-trigger, biocompatible, shape-memory polymers. In Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting. Society for Biomaterials. 2019. (Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium).
Pieri, Katy ; Chando, Paul ; Soman, Pranav ; Henderson, James H. / Programming via printing : Printing of ready-to-trigger, biocompatible, shape-memory polymers. Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting. Society for Biomaterials, 2019. (Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium).
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