Producing hegemony: state/society relations and the politics of productivity in the United States

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14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Argues for a historical reinterpretation of the social bases of American global hegemony in this century. The first part builds a case for three related propositions: prevailing theoretical traditions in international political economy embody inadequate conceptions of states, state powers, and state/society relations and are largely unable to interpret the historically concrete processes by which the socio-political basis of American global power was constructed in the twentieth century; recent scholarship in historical political economy suggests potentially fruitful alternatives to prevailing understandings of state powers and the core relations of American global hegemony in this century; and in light of the first two propositions a historical reinterpretation of the socio-political core of American hegemony is warranted. As a step in this direction, the second part of the paper suggests an alternative interpretation. It is argued that the extraordinary global powers of the US were made possible by a reconstruction of state/society relations peculiar to it, simultaneously creating the social infrastructure of mass production and consumption while maintaining the formal separation between the spheres of politics and economics, public and private, which is characteristic of liberal capitalist social formations. -from Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-456
Number of pages30
JournalInternational Studies Quarterly
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

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