Prevention of child maltreatment in high-risk rural families: A randomized clinical trial with child welfare outcomes

Jane F. Silovsky, David Bard, Mark Chaffin, Debra Hecht, Lorena Burris, Arthur Owora, Lana Beasley, Debbie Doughty, John Lutzker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Few studies have specifically examined prevention of child maltreatment among higher-risk populations in rural communities. The overarching goal of this study was to conduct a randomized clinical trial of SafeCare augmented for rural high-risk population (SC+) compared to standard home-based mental health services (SAU) to examine reductions in future child maltreatment reports, as well as risk factors and factors proximal to child maltreatment. Parents (N = 105) of young children (5. years or less) who had identifiable risk of depression, intimate partner violence, or substance abuse were randomized to SC+ or SAU. Participants randomized to SC+ were more likely to enroll (83% vs. 35% for SAU) and remain in services (35. h vs. 8. h for SAU). SC+ (for participants who successfully completed services) may have had limited impact on child welfare reports during service provision. Further, SC+ had fewer child welfare reports related to DV than SAU. Parent self-reports of parenting behaviors, risk factors, and protective factors did not demonstrate significant sustained program impact. Limitations include power constraints related to sample size. Promising next steps entail future trials with larger sample sizes examining service compliance and further augmentation of SafeCare to bolster service impact and address risk and protective factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1435-1444
Number of pages10
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

maltreatment of children
Child Abuse
Child Welfare
child welfare
Randomized Controlled Trials
Sample Size
maltreatment
Parenting
Mental Health Services
Rural Population
parents
Self Report
Population
Compliance
Substance-Related Disorders
Parents
Depression
risk behavior
rural community
substance abuse

Keywords

  • Child Maltreatment
  • Children
  • Prevention
  • SafeCare

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Prevention of child maltreatment in high-risk rural families : A randomized clinical trial with child welfare outcomes. / Silovsky, Jane F.; Bard, David; Chaffin, Mark; Hecht, Debra; Burris, Lorena; Owora, Arthur; Beasley, Lana; Doughty, Debbie; Lutzker, John.

In: Children and Youth Services Review, Vol. 33, No. 8, 08.2011, p. 1435-1444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Silovsky, JF, Bard, D, Chaffin, M, Hecht, D, Burris, L, Owora, A, Beasley, L, Doughty, D & Lutzker, J 2011, 'Prevention of child maltreatment in high-risk rural families: A randomized clinical trial with child welfare outcomes', Children and Youth Services Review, vol. 33, no. 8, pp. 1435-1444. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2011.04.023
Silovsky, Jane F. ; Bard, David ; Chaffin, Mark ; Hecht, Debra ; Burris, Lorena ; Owora, Arthur ; Beasley, Lana ; Doughty, Debbie ; Lutzker, John. / Prevention of child maltreatment in high-risk rural families : A randomized clinical trial with child welfare outcomes. In: Children and Youth Services Review. 2011 ; Vol. 33, No. 8. pp. 1435-1444.
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