Positive and negative perceived consequences of first intercourse among middle and high school students in Puebla, Mexico

Sara A. Vasilenko, Graciela Espinosa-Hernández, Linda C. Halgunseth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract: Relatively little is known about young people’s interpretations of sexual behaviour in Latin America. In this study, we examine the most commonly perceived consequences of first sexual intercourse among Mexican middle and high school students, how perceived consequences differ by gender, and factors that may predict experiencing more positive or negative consequences. Sexually active Mexican students aged 12–19 years (n = 268) reported whether they had experienced each of 19 consequences following first intercourse. Both positive consequences, such as physical satisfaction and closeness to partner, and negative consequences, such as worry about STDs and pregnancy, were common. Sex with a non-relationship partner was associated with fewer positive and more negative consequences, with the effect for positive consequences being stronger for young women. Pressure to have sex was associated with fewer positive consequences of first intercourse, and pressure to remain a virgin was associated with more positive and negative consequences. These findings suggest that young people often report mixed feelings about their first sexual intercourse and that relationship context and sexual socialisation influence their perceptions of the event.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)582-596
Number of pages15
JournalCulture, Health and Sexuality
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 3 2016

Keywords

  • Mexico
  • Sexual behaviour
  • consequences of sex
  • first intercourse
  • young people

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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