Persuasiveness of HIV/AIDS public service announcements as a function of argument quality, personal relevance, and evidence form

Jueman Zhang, T. Makana Chock, Gina Masullo Chen, Valarie Schweisberger, Yi Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

We conducted an experiment with a mixed factorial design to examine how HIV/AIDS public service announcements (PSAs) that varied in quality of argument, level of personal relevance, and form of evidence, affected attitude and behavioral intention toward condom use with main and nonmain partners. Participants were 85 heterosexually active young adults at a northeastern university in the United States. Results showed that argument quality influenced attitude toward condom use regardless of partner type, and level of personal relevance influenced attitude toward condom use with main partners but not with nonmain partners. There was no difference in attitude or behavioral intention according to whether the evidence was narrative or statistical. The attitudinal effect of personal relevance was more prominent in narrative than in statistical PSAs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1603-1612
Number of pages10
JournalSocial Behavior and Personality
Volume42
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Argument quality
  • Attitude
  • Behavioral intention
  • Condom use
  • HPV/AIDS
  • Narrative evidence
  • Personal relevance
  • Public service announcements
  • Statistical evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Persuasiveness of HIV/AIDS public service announcements as a function of argument quality, personal relevance, and evidence form'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this