Perceiving personal discrimination: The role of group status and legitimizing ideology

Brenda Major, Shannon K. McCoy, Toni Schmader, Richard H. Gramzow, Shana Levin, Jim Sidanius

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

251 Scopus citations

Abstract

It was hypothesized that relative group status and endorsement of ideologies that legitimize group status differences moderate attributions to discrimination in intergroup encounters. According to the status-legitimacy hypothesis, the more members of low-status groups endorse the ideology of individual mobility, the less likely they are to attribute negative outcomes from higher status group members to discrimination. In contrast, the more members of high-status groups endorse individual mobility, the more likely they are to attribute negative outcomes from lower status group members to discrimination. Results from 3 studies using 2 different methodologies provide support for this hypothesis among members of different high-status (European Americans and men) and low-status (African Americans, Latino Americans, and women) groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-282
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume82
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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