Perceived Racial Discrimination and Pain Intensity/Disability Among Economically Disadvantaged Latinos in a Federally Qualified Health Center: The Role of Anxiety Sensitivity

Jafar Bakhshaie, Andrew H. Rogers, Nubia A. Mayorga, Joseph W Ditre, Rubén Rodríguez-Cano, Ana C. Ruiz, Andres G. Viana, Monica Garza, Chad Lemaire, Melissa Ochoa-Perez, Daniel Bogiaizian, Michael J. Zvolensky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined the role of anxiety sensitivity (AS; fear of the negative consequences of anxiety) in the relation between perceived racial discrimination and pain-related problems among Latinos seeking health services at a Federally Qualified Health Center. Participants included 145 adult Latinos (87.80% female, Mage = 38.07 years, SD = 11.98, and 96.2% reported Spanish as their first language). Results indicated that perceived racial discrimination was indirectly related to the pain intensity and pain disability through AS. These effects were evident above and beyond the variance accounted for by gender, age, marital status, educational status, employment status, years living in the United States, and number of axis I diagnoses. Overall, the present findings highlight the merit in focusing further scientific attention on the interplay between perceived racial discrimination and AS to better understand and inform interventions to reduce pain problems among Latinos in primary care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 19 2018

Fingerprint

Racism
Vulnerable Populations
Hispanic Americans
Anxiety
Pain
Health
Educational Status
Marital Status
Health Services
Fear
Primary Health Care
Language

Keywords

  • Anxiety sensitivity
  • Disparity
  • Latino
  • Pain disability
  • Pain intensity
  • Perceived discrimination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Perceived Racial Discrimination and Pain Intensity/Disability Among Economically Disadvantaged Latinos in a Federally Qualified Health Center : The Role of Anxiety Sensitivity. / Bakhshaie, Jafar; Rogers, Andrew H.; Mayorga, Nubia A.; Ditre, Joseph W; Rodríguez-Cano, Rubén; Ruiz, Ana C.; Viana, Andres G.; Garza, Monica; Lemaire, Chad; Ochoa-Perez, Melissa; Bogiaizian, Daniel; Zvolensky, Michael J.

In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 19.02.2018, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bakhshaie, Jafar ; Rogers, Andrew H. ; Mayorga, Nubia A. ; Ditre, Joseph W ; Rodríguez-Cano, Rubén ; Ruiz, Ana C. ; Viana, Andres G. ; Garza, Monica ; Lemaire, Chad ; Ochoa-Perez, Melissa ; Bogiaizian, Daniel ; Zvolensky, Michael J. / Perceived Racial Discrimination and Pain Intensity/Disability Among Economically Disadvantaged Latinos in a Federally Qualified Health Center : The Role of Anxiety Sensitivity. In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. 2018 ; pp. 1-9.
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