Parent–Adult Child Religious Discordance: Consequences for Intergenerational Solidarity Across Several Decades

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article focused on the relationship between parent–child religious discordance (affiliation, intensity, and attendance) in early adulthood and children’s perceived affectual and associational solidarity with their parents across 20 years. The data derived from eight waves of the Longitudinal Study of Generations between 1971 and 2005. We selected 635 young adult children whose mothers and/or fathers also reported their religious orientations in 1971 and then constructed mother–child dyads (n = 584) and father–child dyads (n = 475). Results showed that religious affiliation discordance between parents and children negatively and consistently lowered children’s affectual and associational solidarity with parents over several decades regardless of parents’ gender. However, intergenerational discordance in religious intensity and religious attendance showed no such association. These findings indicate that discontinuity in denominational identification is more disruptive to intergenerational relations than discontinuity in religious strength and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Family Issues
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

solidarity
parents
denomination
dyad
Intergenerational relations
adulthood
young adult
longitudinal study
father
gender

Keywords

  • aging
  • intergenerational solidarity
  • religious affiliation
  • religious attendance
  • religious intensity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

@article{24bc3f4504bb488c90c889b9ab8808a2,
title = "Parent–Adult Child Religious Discordance: Consequences for Intergenerational Solidarity Across Several Decades",
abstract = "This article focused on the relationship between parent–child religious discordance (affiliation, intensity, and attendance) in early adulthood and children’s perceived affectual and associational solidarity with their parents across 20 years. The data derived from eight waves of the Longitudinal Study of Generations between 1971 and 2005. We selected 635 young adult children whose mothers and/or fathers also reported their religious orientations in 1971 and then constructed mother–child dyads (n = 584) and father–child dyads (n = 475). Results showed that religious affiliation discordance between parents and children negatively and consistently lowered children’s affectual and associational solidarity with parents over several decades regardless of parents’ gender. However, intergenerational discordance in religious intensity and religious attendance showed no such association. These findings indicate that discontinuity in denominational identification is more disruptive to intergenerational relations than discontinuity in religious strength and practice.",
keywords = "aging, intergenerational solidarity, religious affiliation, religious attendance, religious intensity",
author = "Woosang Hwang and Silverstein, {Merril D} and Brown, {Maria T}",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0192513X17710775",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Family Issues",
issn = "0192-513X",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parent–Adult Child Religious Discordance

T2 - Consequences for Intergenerational Solidarity Across Several Decades

AU - Hwang, Woosang

AU - Silverstein, Merril D

AU - Brown, Maria T

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - This article focused on the relationship between parent–child religious discordance (affiliation, intensity, and attendance) in early adulthood and children’s perceived affectual and associational solidarity with their parents across 20 years. The data derived from eight waves of the Longitudinal Study of Generations between 1971 and 2005. We selected 635 young adult children whose mothers and/or fathers also reported their religious orientations in 1971 and then constructed mother–child dyads (n = 584) and father–child dyads (n = 475). Results showed that religious affiliation discordance between parents and children negatively and consistently lowered children’s affectual and associational solidarity with parents over several decades regardless of parents’ gender. However, intergenerational discordance in religious intensity and religious attendance showed no such association. These findings indicate that discontinuity in denominational identification is more disruptive to intergenerational relations than discontinuity in religious strength and practice.

AB - This article focused on the relationship between parent–child religious discordance (affiliation, intensity, and attendance) in early adulthood and children’s perceived affectual and associational solidarity with their parents across 20 years. The data derived from eight waves of the Longitudinal Study of Generations between 1971 and 2005. We selected 635 young adult children whose mothers and/or fathers also reported their religious orientations in 1971 and then constructed mother–child dyads (n = 584) and father–child dyads (n = 475). Results showed that religious affiliation discordance between parents and children negatively and consistently lowered children’s affectual and associational solidarity with parents over several decades regardless of parents’ gender. However, intergenerational discordance in religious intensity and religious attendance showed no such association. These findings indicate that discontinuity in denominational identification is more disruptive to intergenerational relations than discontinuity in religious strength and practice.

KW - aging

KW - intergenerational solidarity

KW - religious affiliation

KW - religious attendance

KW - religious intensity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85041417656&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85041417656&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0192513X17710775

DO - 10.1177/0192513X17710775

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85041417656

JO - Journal of Family Issues

JF - Journal of Family Issues

SN - 0192-513X

ER -