Pain Severity in Relation to Smoking Cessation Problems and Self-Efficacy for Quitting among Latinx Individuals Who Smoke Cigarettes: The Moderating Role of Perceived Discrimination

Lorra Garey, Aniqua Salwa, Tanya Smit, Nubia A. Mayorga, Brooke Y. Redmond, Sofia B. Fernandez, Joseph W. Ditre, Ezemenari Obasi, Michael J. Zvolensky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Latinx individuals experience significant tobacco cigarette smoking-related diseases and illnesses. Although most Latinx smokers report a desire to quit smoking, evidenced-based cessation treatments are underutilized in this group, which may partially be due to lower likelihood of receiving advice from a healthcare professional. Further, there are a lack of cessation treatments that account for comorbid symptoms/conditions (e.g., co-occurring pain) and social determinants of health (e.g., perceived discrimination). Extant work has established the reciprocal relation between pain and smoking trajectories. Additionally, although social determinants, such as perceived racial/ethnic discrimination, have demonstrated clinical relevance to a variety of health-related behaviors, limited work has examined the role of perceived discrimination in pain-smoking relations. The current study examined the effects of perceived discrimination and pain severity in relation to smoking cessation problems and self-efficacy for quitting among Latinx cigarette smokers. Method: Participants included 226 (Mage = 34.95 years, SD = 8.62; 38.5% female) adult Latinx daily cigarette smokers. Results: Results indicated that the interaction of pain and perceived discrimination was predictive of greater quit problems (p = 0.041) as well as greater confidence in the ability to refrain from smoking in response to internal (p < 0.001) and external stimuli (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Overall, this work provides a more nuanced understanding of the psychosocial contexts in which Latinx smokers may encounter problems related to quitting, and this data is important for future smoking cessation research and treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-234
Number of pages10
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2024

Keywords

  • Latinx/Hispanic
  • Pain severity
  • cigarette
  • self-efficacy
  • smoking cessation
  • tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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