Organisational databases of personnel information: Contrasting the concerns of human resource managers and employees

Jeffrey M. Stanton, Elizabeth M. Weiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Computerisation, networking, and electronic surveillance and monitoring have individually and conjointly affected the practises of human resources (HR) management in work organisations. These technologies enhance the ability of HR professionals to gather, store, and process information about employees. We report results from two semi-structured interview studies - one of HR managers (n = 5) and one of employees (n = 15) - that contrast the concerns of these two groups on issues of personnel data, privacy, and technology. We used qualitative data coding techniques and quantitative analysis of code assignments to uncover patterns in interviewees' responses. Our findings revealed concordance between HR managers and employees in regard to the criticality of trust and justification in relation to the collection of personnel data through technological and non-technological means. Results also revealed divergences between managers and employees in knowledge of human resources policies and legal constraints as well as in beliefs about the importance of privacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-304
Number of pages14
JournalBehaviour and Information Technology
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Human-Computer Interaction

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