Organics in environmental ices: Sources, chemistry, and impacts

V. F. McNeill, A. M. Grannas, J. P D Abbatt, M. Ammann, P. Ariya, T. Bartels-Rausch, F. Domine, D. J. Donaldson, M. I. Guzman, D. Heger, Tara F Kahan, P. Klán, S. Masclin, C. Toubin, D. Voisin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The physical, chemical, and biological processes involving organics in ice in the environment impact a number of atmospheric and biogeochemical cycles. Organic material in snow or ice may be biological in origin, deposited from aerosols or atmospheric gases, or formed chemically in situ. In this manuscript, we review the current state of knowledge regarding the sources, properties, and chemistry of organic materials in environmental ices. Several outstanding questions remain to be resolved and fundamental data gathered before an accurate model of transformations and transport of organic species in the cryosphere will be possible. For example, more information is needed regarding the quantitative impacts of chemical and biological processes, ice morphology, and snow formation on the fate of organic material in cold regions. Interdisciplinary work at the interfaces of chemistry, physics and biology is needed in order to fully characterize the nature and evolution of organics in the cryosphere and predict the effects of climate change on the Earth's carbon cycle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9653-9678
Number of pages26
JournalAtmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Volume12
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

ice
cryosphere
chemical process
biological processes
snow
cold region
atmospheric gas
biogeochemical cycle
carbon cycle
physics
aerosol
climate change
material
physical process
effect
in situ

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

McNeill, V. F., Grannas, A. M., Abbatt, J. P. D., Ammann, M., Ariya, P., Bartels-Rausch, T., ... Voisin, D. (2012). Organics in environmental ices: Sources, chemistry, and impacts. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12(20), 9653-9678. https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-12-9653-2012

Organics in environmental ices : Sources, chemistry, and impacts. / McNeill, V. F.; Grannas, A. M.; Abbatt, J. P D; Ammann, M.; Ariya, P.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Domine, F.; Donaldson, D. J.; Guzman, M. I.; Heger, D.; Kahan, Tara F; Klán, P.; Masclin, S.; Toubin, C.; Voisin, D.

In: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol. 12, No. 20, 2012, p. 9653-9678.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McNeill, VF, Grannas, AM, Abbatt, JPD, Ammann, M, Ariya, P, Bartels-Rausch, T, Domine, F, Donaldson, DJ, Guzman, MI, Heger, D, Kahan, TF, Klán, P, Masclin, S, Toubin, C & Voisin, D 2012, 'Organics in environmental ices: Sources, chemistry, and impacts', Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 12, no. 20, pp. 9653-9678. https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-12-9653-2012
McNeill VF, Grannas AM, Abbatt JPD, Ammann M, Ariya P, Bartels-Rausch T et al. Organics in environmental ices: Sources, chemistry, and impacts. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. 2012;12(20):9653-9678. https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-12-9653-2012
McNeill, V. F. ; Grannas, A. M. ; Abbatt, J. P D ; Ammann, M. ; Ariya, P. ; Bartels-Rausch, T. ; Domine, F. ; Donaldson, D. J. ; Guzman, M. I. ; Heger, D. ; Kahan, Tara F ; Klán, P. ; Masclin, S. ; Toubin, C. ; Voisin, D. / Organics in environmental ices : Sources, chemistry, and impacts. In: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. 2012 ; Vol. 12, No. 20. pp. 9653-9678.
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