Organic development: A top-down and bottom-up approach to design of public sector information systems

Michael Tyworth, Steve Sawyer

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

In this paper we lay out interim findings and speculate on the implications for practice and theory of integrated criminal justice systems in law enforcement. In doing this we theorize on public sector information systems and their uses of information and communication technologies as engaging in what we call "organic development." To develop our theorizing on organic development, we draw on a field study of the San Diego, California area's Automated Regional Justice Information System (ARJIS). We develop organic development as drawing on both top-down and bottom up approaches to engaging the technologies, technological infrastructures, governance principles, and work practices that, together, are an integrated system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages105-112
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event7th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research, Dg.o 2006 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: May 21 2006May 24 2006

Other

Other7th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research, Dg.o 2006
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period5/21/065/24/06

Keywords

  • Emergent design
  • Institutional theory
  • Integrated criminal justice systems
  • Organic design
  • Social informatics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Computer Networks and Communications

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    Tyworth, M., & Sawyer, S. (2006). Organic development: A top-down and bottom-up approach to design of public sector information systems. 105-112. Paper presented at 7th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research, Dg.o 2006, San Diego, CA, United States. https://doi.org/10.1145/1146598.1146633