Opioid misuse and perceived smoking-pain relationships among HIV+ individuals with pain: Exploring negative affect responses to pain

Andrew H. Rogers, Lisa R. LaRowe, Joseph W Ditre, Michael J. Zvolensky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) report high rates of clinically significant pain that is associated with several negative outcomes, including higher CD4 T-cell count, poor medication adherence, and substance use and misuse. Importantly, PLWHA also report elevated rates of both opioid and tobacco use, and these elevated rates have often been associated with increased pain experience. Although research suggests that negative affective responses to pain may be uniquely associated with substance misuse among individuals in the general population, little work has examined these relations among PLWHA. The current study examined negative emotions in response to pain as a predictor of current opioid misuse, future opioid misuse, and perceived smoking-pain relationships among 66 (Mage = 51.26, SD = 8.00, 60.6% male) HIV+ adults with co-occurring pain. Results indicated that negative emotions in response to pain uniquely predicted each of the substance use outcomes, with clinically significant effect sizes that may be characterized as medium in magnitude. Overall, these findings suggest that negative affective responses to pain may play a role in prescription opioid misuse and smoking among PLWHA. These findings may inform the development of tailored interventions for PLWHA smokers who are prescribed opioid pain medications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-162
Number of pages6
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume88
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Opioid Analgesics
Smoking
HIV
Pain
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
T-cells
Tobacco
Emotions
Medication Adherence
Tobacco Use
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Prescriptions
T-Lymphocytes
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Coping
  • HIV
  • Opioid
  • Pain
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Toxicology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Opioid misuse and perceived smoking-pain relationships among HIV+ individuals with pain : Exploring negative affect responses to pain. / Rogers, Andrew H.; LaRowe, Lisa R.; Ditre, Joseph W; Zvolensky, Michael J.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 88, 01.01.2019, p. 157-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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