Opioid and Cannabis Co-Use among Adults with Chronic Pain: Relations to Substance Misuse, Mental Health, and Pain Experience

Andrew H. Rogers, Jafar Bakhshaie, Julia D. Buckner, Michael F. Orr, Daniel J. Paulus, Joseph W Ditre, Michael J. Zvolensky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Opioid misuse constitutes a significant public health problem and is associated with a host of negative outcomes. Despite efforts to curb this increasing epidemic, opioids remain the most widely prescribed class of medications. Prescription opioids are often used to treat chronic pain despite the risks associated with use, and chronic pain remains an important factor in understanding this epidemic. Cannabis is another substance that has recently garnered attention in the chronic pain literature, as increasing numbers of individuals use cannabis to manage chronic pain. Importantly, the co-use of substances generally is associated with poorer outcomes than single substance use, yet little work has examined the impact of opioid-cannabis co-use.Methods:The current study examined the use of opioids alone, compared to use of opioid and cannabis co-use, among adults (n=450) with chronic pain on mental health, pain, and substance use outcomes.Results:Results suggest that, compared to opioid use alone, opioid and cannabis co-use was associated with elevated anxiety and depression symptoms, as well as tobacco, alcohol, cocaine, and sedative use problems, but not pain experience.Conclusions:These findings highlight a vulnerable population of polysubstance users with chronic pain, and indicates the need for more comprehensive assessment and treatment of chronic pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-294
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Addiction Medicine
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

Fingerprint

Cannabis
Chronic Pain
Opioid Analgesics
Mental Health
Pain
Vulnerable Populations
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Cocaine
Tobacco
Prescriptions
Anxiety
Public Health
Alcohols
Depression

Keywords

  • cannabis
  • chronic pain
  • mental health
  • opioid
  • substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Opioid and Cannabis Co-Use among Adults with Chronic Pain : Relations to Substance Misuse, Mental Health, and Pain Experience. / Rogers, Andrew H.; Bakhshaie, Jafar; Buckner, Julia D.; Orr, Michael F.; Paulus, Daniel J.; Ditre, Joseph W; Zvolensky, Michael J.

In: Journal of Addiction Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.07.2019, p. 287-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rogers, Andrew H. ; Bakhshaie, Jafar ; Buckner, Julia D. ; Orr, Michael F. ; Paulus, Daniel J. ; Ditre, Joseph W ; Zvolensky, Michael J. / Opioid and Cannabis Co-Use among Adults with Chronic Pain : Relations to Substance Misuse, Mental Health, and Pain Experience. In: Journal of Addiction Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 287-294.
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