On why joint attention might look atypical in autism: A case for a strong policy statement but more nuanced empirical story

Jacob A. Burack, Natalie Russo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the present response to Gernsbacher, Stevenson, Khandakar, and Goldsmith (2008), we support the positivistic and strength-based perspective taken by the authors in understanding the abilities and skills of persons with autism. However, we argue that a more tempered approach - one that encompasses a developmental perspective, as well as a more comprehensive review of both the supporting and the contradictory empirical evidence - is warranted in advancing their conclusions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-48
Number of pages3
JournalChild Development Perspectives
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Autism
  • Development
  • Methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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