Narrating Access and Agency: Students With Intellectual Disability Share Their Experiences With Higher Education

Phillandra S. Smith, Beth Myers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Growing numbers of students with intellectual disability (ID) have gained access to universities and colleges through the development of inclusive postsecondary education (IPSE) programs. Despite having physical access to college and university campuses and even classroom spaces, navigating access to actual course content remains a challenge for many students and their instructors. Using semi-structured interviews with 10 students with ID at an IPSE program in the northeastern United States, this qualitative study was conducted to examine students’ experiences accessing course content in university courses. We highlight factors that students identified as significant contributors to their ability to access course content and experience success in the courses they took. Findings reveal that the students attribute a positive or negative course experience to course instructors’ relatability and ability to make course content accessible. Students discussed their desire to be viewed as fully matriculated students while receiving support. Implications for practice are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalRemedial and Special Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • higher education
  • inclusive postsecondary programs
  • intellectual disability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Narrating Access and Agency: Students With Intellectual Disability Share Their Experiences With Higher Education'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this