Motivations for viewers using social media during the olympic games: Implications for the future of sports broadcasting

Joon Soo Lim, Youngchan Hwang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter begins with a recent claim by Nielsen Media Research that Twitter patter influences attention to specific television programs and vice versa. The properly tuned traffic app might direct viewers to a menu of second-screen options while simultaneously excluding sites and services often considered overly crass, commercial, opportunistic, or irritating. One of many popular uses of the second screen is social media activity. Miao Guo and Michael Holmes found shorter gaze patterns for news and reality programs than for entertainment and sports. Both the eye-gaze and the Twitter study illustrate, when the alternative experience is an interactive second-screen device, there is at least significant opportunity for program-related engagement. Media pundits including Jon Stewart and John Oliver have criticized corporations and advertisers for hijacking social media conversations like unwanted guests at a cocktail party. It may be too late to save legacy television network program executives from the nefarious influence of Dr. Horrible’s insidious Sing-Along Blog.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDigital Technology and the Future of Broadcasting
Subtitle of host publicationGlobal Perspectives
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages3-30
Number of pages28
ISBN (Electronic)9781317486954
ISBN (Print)9781138891227
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

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