Motivation to address self-reported hearing problems in adults with normal hearing thresholds

Carly C.M. Alicea, Karen A Doherty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the motivation to change in relation to hearing problems in adults with normal hearing thresholds but who report hearing problems and that of adults with a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Factors related to their motivation were also assessed. Method: The motivation to change in relation to self-reported hearing problems was measured using the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (McConnaughy, Prochaska, & Velicer, 1983). The relationship between objective and subjective measures and an adult’s motivation was examined. Results: The level of hearing handicap did not differ significantly between adults with normal hearing who reported problems hearing in background noise and adults who had a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing handicap, personal distress, and minimization of hearing loss were factors significantly related to motivation. Age, degree of hearing loss, speech-in-noise scores, working memory, and extended high-frequency average thresholds were not significantly related to their motivation. Conclusions: Adults with normal hearing thresholds but self-reported hearing problems had the same level of hearing handicap and were equally motivated to take action for their hearing problems as age-matched adults with a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing handicap, personal distress, and minimization of hearing loss were most strongly correlated with an individual’s motivation to change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3642-3655
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume60
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Hearing
Motivation
Handicap
Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Hearing Loss
Noise
Short-Term Memory
Hearing Impairment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Motivation to address self-reported hearing problems in adults with normal hearing thresholds. / Alicea, Carly C.M.; Doherty, Karen A.

In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 60, No. 12, 01.12.2017, p. 3642-3655.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4aae9d6c885642989491e63f8b437dcb,
title = "Motivation to address self-reported hearing problems in adults with normal hearing thresholds",
abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the motivation to change in relation to hearing problems in adults with normal hearing thresholds but who report hearing problems and that of adults with a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Factors related to their motivation were also assessed. Method: The motivation to change in relation to self-reported hearing problems was measured using the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (McConnaughy, Prochaska, & Velicer, 1983). The relationship between objective and subjective measures and an adult’s motivation was examined. Results: The level of hearing handicap did not differ significantly between adults with normal hearing who reported problems hearing in background noise and adults who had a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing handicap, personal distress, and minimization of hearing loss were factors significantly related to motivation. Age, degree of hearing loss, speech-in-noise scores, working memory, and extended high-frequency average thresholds were not significantly related to their motivation. Conclusions: Adults with normal hearing thresholds but self-reported hearing problems had the same level of hearing handicap and were equally motivated to take action for their hearing problems as age-matched adults with a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing handicap, personal distress, and minimization of hearing loss were most strongly correlated with an individual’s motivation to change.",
author = "Alicea, {Carly C.M.} and Doherty, {Karen A}",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0110",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "60",
pages = "3642--3655",
journal = "Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research",
issn = "1092-4388",
publisher = "American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Motivation to address self-reported hearing problems in adults with normal hearing thresholds

AU - Alicea, Carly C.M.

AU - Doherty, Karen A

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the motivation to change in relation to hearing problems in adults with normal hearing thresholds but who report hearing problems and that of adults with a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Factors related to their motivation were also assessed. Method: The motivation to change in relation to self-reported hearing problems was measured using the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (McConnaughy, Prochaska, & Velicer, 1983). The relationship between objective and subjective measures and an adult’s motivation was examined. Results: The level of hearing handicap did not differ significantly between adults with normal hearing who reported problems hearing in background noise and adults who had a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing handicap, personal distress, and minimization of hearing loss were factors significantly related to motivation. Age, degree of hearing loss, speech-in-noise scores, working memory, and extended high-frequency average thresholds were not significantly related to their motivation. Conclusions: Adults with normal hearing thresholds but self-reported hearing problems had the same level of hearing handicap and were equally motivated to take action for their hearing problems as age-matched adults with a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing handicap, personal distress, and minimization of hearing loss were most strongly correlated with an individual’s motivation to change.

AB - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the motivation to change in relation to hearing problems in adults with normal hearing thresholds but who report hearing problems and that of adults with a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Factors related to their motivation were also assessed. Method: The motivation to change in relation to self-reported hearing problems was measured using the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (McConnaughy, Prochaska, & Velicer, 1983). The relationship between objective and subjective measures and an adult’s motivation was examined. Results: The level of hearing handicap did not differ significantly between adults with normal hearing who reported problems hearing in background noise and adults who had a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing handicap, personal distress, and minimization of hearing loss were factors significantly related to motivation. Age, degree of hearing loss, speech-in-noise scores, working memory, and extended high-frequency average thresholds were not significantly related to their motivation. Conclusions: Adults with normal hearing thresholds but self-reported hearing problems had the same level of hearing handicap and were equally motivated to take action for their hearing problems as age-matched adults with a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing handicap, personal distress, and minimization of hearing loss were most strongly correlated with an individual’s motivation to change.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85038810874&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85038810874&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0110

DO - 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0110

M3 - Article

VL - 60

SP - 3642

EP - 3655

JO - Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research

JF - Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research

SN - 1092-4388

IS - 12

ER -