Mother-infant, father-infant interaction and involvement in childcare and household labor among Taiwanese families

Li Ching Sun, Jaipaul L. Roopnarine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mother-infant and father-infant interactions were observed in the home, and parents provided estimates of their involvement in caregiving and household activities in 25 Taiwanese families. Observations indicated that mothers held infants more than did fathers and were more likely to feed, smile at, vocalize to, and engage in object play with than were fathers. Fathers engaged in more rough play with infants than did mothers. There were no gender-of-parent differences in soothing infants or displaying affection to them. Mothers and fathers treated males and females quite similarly. Infants smiled at, vocalized to, approached, and were more distressed in the presence of mothers than in the presence of fathers. The questionaire data revealed a markedly gender-differentiated pattern of involvement in chidcare and household activities. The results were hypothesized to reflect Taiwanese societal rigidity in gender roles and filial piety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-129
Number of pages9
JournalInfant Behavior and Development
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Keywords

  • Infants
  • Interactions
  • Taiwanese families

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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