More controlling child-feeding practices are found among parents of boys with an average body mass index compared with parents of boys with a high body mass index

Lynn S. Brann, Jean D. Skinner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine if differences existed in mothers' and fathers' perceptions of their sons' weight, controlling child-feeding practices (ie, restriction, monitoring, and pressure to eat), and parenting styles (ie, authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive) by their sons' body mass index (BMI). Design: One person (L.S.B.) interviewed mothers and boys using validated questionnaires and measured boys' weight and height; fathers completed questionnaires independently. Subjects/setting: Subjects were white, preadolescent boys and their parents. Boys were grouped by their BMI into an average BMI group (n=25; BMI percentile between 33rd and 68th) and a high BMI group (n=24; BMI percentile ≥85th). Statistical analyses performed: Multivariate analyses of variance and analyses of variance. Results: Mothers and fathers of boys with a high BMI saw their sons as more overweight (mothers P=.03, fathers P=.01), were more concerned about their sons' weight (P<.0001, P=.004), and used pressure to eat with their sons less often than mothers and fathers of boys with an average BMI (P<.0001, P<.0001). In addition, fathers of boys with a high BMI monitored their sons' eating less often than fathers of boys with an average BMI (P=.006). No differences were found in parenting by boys' BMI groups for either mothers or fathers. Conclusions: More controlling child-feeding practices were found among mothers (pressure to eat) and fathers (pressure to eat and monitoring) of boys with an average BMI compared with parents of boys with a high BMI. A better understanding of the relationships between feeding practices and boys' weight is necessary. However, longitudinal research is needed to provide evidence of causal association.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1411-1416
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume105
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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