Metadiscourse in group supervision: How school counselors-in-training construct their transitional professional identities

Cynthia Gordon, Melissa M Luke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

We use discourse analysis to examine a group supervision meeting in which graduate students who are training to become school counselors discuss counseling experiences that they had at local high schools. Focusing on metadiscourse, or talk about talk, we integrate Ochs’ concepts of epistemic stance and affective stance and Tannen’s discussion of linguistic strategies as ambiguous and polysemous in terms of power and solidarity in order to demonstrate how counselors-in-training construct their identities as what Woodside et al. call ‘boundary-dwellers’ in their professional community of practice. Examination of metadiscourse regarding address terms and the speech act of asking questions – and in particular highlighting how participants use negatively valenced affect words, the verb feel, and what Tannen calls ‘constructed dialogue’ – reveals their stances of uncertainty and discomfort, their transitional professional identities as entailing an uneasy navigation of relationships, and their recognition of the pivotal role of language in the process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-43
Number of pages19
JournalDiscourse Studies
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Keywords

  • Address terms
  • discourse analysis
  • metadiscourse
  • power and solidarity
  • professional identity development
  • speech acts
  • stance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Social Psychology
  • Anthropology
  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

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