Memory modulation across neural systems: Intra-amygdala glucose reverses deficits caused by intraseptal morphine on a spatial task but not on an aversive task

Ewan C. McNay, Paul E. Gold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

Based largely on dissociations of the effects of different lesions on learning and memory, memories for different attributes appear to be organized in independent neural systems. Results obtained with direct injections of drugs into one brain region at a time support a similar conclusion. The present experiments investigated the effects of simultaneous pharmacological manipulation of two neural systems, the amygdala and the septohippocampal system, to examine possible interactions of memory modulation across systems. Morphine injected into the medial septum impaired memory both for avoidance training and during spontaneous alternation. When glucose was concomitantly administered to the amygdala, glucose reversed the morphine-induced deficits in memory during alternation but not for avoidance training. These results suggest that the amygdala is involved in modulation of spatial memory processes and that direct injections of memory-modulating drugs into the amygdala do not always modulate memory for aversive events. These findings are contrary to predictions from the findings of lesion studies and of studies using direct injections of drugs into single brain areas. Thus, the independence of neural systems responsible for processing different classes of memory is less clear than implied by studies using lesions or injections of drugs into single brain areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3853-3858
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 1998

Keywords

  • Amygdala
  • Glucose
  • Inhibitory avoidance
  • Medial septum
  • Memory
  • Morphine
  • Neural systems
  • Spontaneous alternation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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