Mechanical Properties of Metal Connectors Soldered by Gas Torch Versus an Infrared Technique

Ansgar C. Cheng, John Y. Chai, Jeremy Gilbert, Lee M. Jameson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose The ultimate tensile strength and percentage elongation of solder joints of three alloy systems were tested. Materials and Methods Solder joints were formed using either an infrared soldering machine or gas‐oxygen torch. Intact solder materials were used as controls. Results There were no significant differences in percentage elongation among different treatment methods of the solders or among various solder materials. All intact solder materials possessed significantly higher ultimate tensile strength than the joints made with either method. For high‐noble and noble alloy solders, there were no significant differences in ultimate tensile strength of joints made with either method. For base metal alloy solder, the ultimate tensile strength of joints made with the infrared technique was significantly higher than that made with the gas‐oxygen torch technique. Conclusions The infrared technique can be used as an alternative to the gas‐torch technique for soldering high‐noble and noble alloys. It is superior to the gas‐torch technique for soldering a cobalt‐chromium alloy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-109
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Prosthodontics
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1993

Keywords

  • dental solder joint
  • dental soldering alloys
  • soldering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

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