Measuring Belief Bias with Ternary Response Sets

Samuel Winiger, Henrik Singmann, David Kellen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Belief bias in syllogistic reasoning refers to the finding that individuals are more likely to accept believable than unbelievable conclusions independent of their logical validity. Most theories argue that belief bias is driven by differences in reasoning processes between believable and unbelievable syllogisms. In contrast, Dube, Rotello, and Heit (2010) proposed that belief bias is solely an effect of response processes. We investigated belief bias without having to rely on response bias manipulations (Klauer, Musch, and Naumer, 2000) or confidence ratings (Dube et al., 2010). Instead, we added a third response (“I don't know”) to the usual binary response set (“Yes”/“No”). This allowed us to test belief bias with a fully identified multinomial processing tree model, in a hierarchical Bayesian framework. We found evidence that the belief bias is driven by differences in response processes. Evidence for a difference in reasoning processes was inconclusive.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 40th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2018
PublisherThe Cognitive Science Society
Pages1169-1174
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9780991196784
StatePublished - 2018
Event40th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society: Changing Minds, CogSci 2018 - Madison, United States
Duration: Jul 25 2018Jul 28 2018

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 40th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2018

Conference

Conference40th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society: Changing Minds, CogSci 2018
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityMadison
Period7/25/187/28/18

Keywords

  • belief bias
  • multinomial processing tree models
  • syllogisms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this