Maps in The Times (of London) and The New York Times, 1870-1980: a cross-national study in journalistic cartography.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Times (of London) and The New York Times differ in their use of maps. Until the early 20th century newspaper maps were comparatively rare. The Times (of London) reached a peak between 1920 and 1940, and has declined notably since 1970. In contrast, The New York Times registered large increases around 1940 and, again, around 1960. Proportionately more maps than before are used to illustrate feature articles, and maps have become more prominent in the Sunday Times and the Sunday edition of The New York Times than on weekdays. Although both papers responded cartographically to wars and geopolitical threats, The New York Times has covered a broader range of subjects than The Times (of London), and has used maps more fully for domestic news. During times of high map use, both papers relied heavily on small, single-column maps, which promote a balanced page layout. -Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-66
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings - Pennsylvania Academy of Science
Volume59
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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